Information About Siam Tulips

Information About Siam Tulips

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Siam Tulip Care: Learn How To Grow Siam Tulips

By Becca Badgett, Co-author of How to Grow an EMERGENCY Garden

Cultivating Siam tulip in USDA zones 9-11 adds large, showy tropical flowers and delicate bracts to the outdoor flowerbed. Siam tulip care is modest, and the information in this article will help.


Must You Dig Up Tulip Bulbs and Replant Every Year?

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Spring-flowering tulips (Tulipa spp.) provide dependable garden color each year in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 4 through 10. Maintaining healthy bulbs and selecting the right variety for your climate reduces the need for annual digging by allowing the bulbs to overwinter in the garden bed while also encouraging new flowers next year. All tulips will eventually require digging and replanting, but it doesn't have to be an annual chore.


How to Care for a Curcuma Alismatifolia Plant

The Curcuma Alismatifolia is more commonly known as the Siam Tulip. It’s a tropical flower, native of Thailand, from the Zingiberaceae family. Classified as a ginger, this perennial flower will complement your garden with grace and beauty all summer long. Being a tropical plant, Curcuma Alismatifolia likes hot and humid weather. In the United States it is hardy in gardening zones 9 and higher, although with special care it can be grown in containers farther north.

Water the plants well beginning in the spring when the soil starts to warm up. Allow the soil to dry out about an inch in depth before watering again. Once the flowers are in bloom, do not water from above as the flowers do not like to be wet. If your plant is in a container, move to an area that is protected from heavy rain.

  • The Curcuma Alismatifolia is more commonly known as the Siam Tulip.
  • Being a tropical plant, Curcuma Alismatifolia likes hot and humid weather.

Keep plants from receiving too much direct sunlight. The Curcuma alismatifolia likes a lot of light, but too much direct sunlight will burn the flowers.

Top dress the soil with a couple handfuls of compost each spring. This will loosen the soil and give the plant some added nutrition.

Fertilize with a water soluble tropical flower fertilizer every other week during the growing season. Do not fertilize the plant after flowering until you start to see growth the following spring.

Place container plants on a tray of pebbles and water if the location gets too dry. The plant likes humidity and will grow better if the air isn't too dry, such as indoors with central air conditioning.

  • Keep plants from receiving too much direct sunlight.
  • Do not fertilize the plant after flowering until you start to see growth the following spring.

Re-pot container flowers every two years. This will renew the soil with nutrients and re-energize your plants.


How to Get Here

Getting from Amsterdam to Keukenhof is quite simple via public transportation. There are multiple shuttles every day from Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport directly to the front gate.

Signage at the airport is clear

In the Arrivals 3-4 area of Schiphol, it’s almost impossible to miss the Keukenhof desk with its large video monitors scrolling footage of the beautiful gardens. At the desk, you can purchase tickets either for the shuttle bus alone or combined Keukenhof tickets that include both the shuttle and admission to the gardens.

From the desk, the attendant points out the route to the shuttle buses. Once outside the terminal, there are large electric signs, attendants in bright vests, and large planters filled with tulips all guiding the way to the buses. Essentially, the staff does everything possible to make the departure point very easy to find. The buses for the 35-minute trip run basically back-to-back, although it’s possible there will be a wait on heavy traffic days.

Daffodils in the fields near Lisse

Keukenhof is also accessible via public transportation from Central Station Leiden, Haarlem station, and through group tours.

You can arrive by private car or by motor home and park for just €6, but there is no guarantee that parking will be available. When the parking lot is full, cars are not allowed in and traffic is re-routed. There are four charging stations available for electric cars.

No matter how you choose to get there, Keukenhof is absolutely worth a day on any trip nearby in Europe.

We were the guests of Keukenhof. All opinions of the vibrant and sweet-smelling are our own.


Watch the video: The land of the Siam Tulip