Aloidendron

Aloidendron

Aloidendron is a genus of succulent plants in the subfamily Asphodeloideae. It was split off from the much larger genus Aloe in 2013.

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Plants→Aloes→Quiver Tree (Aloidendron dichotomum)

Botanical names:
Aloidendron dichotomum Accepted
Aloe dichotoma Synonym

General Plant Information (Edit)
Plant Habit: Tree
Cactus/Succulent
Life cycle: Perennial
Sun Requirements: Full Sun
Water Preferences: Dry Mesic
Dry
Minimum cold hardiness: Zone 9a -6.7 °C (20 °F) to -3.9 °C (25 °F)
Plant Height : 30 feet
Leaves: Glaucous
Evergreen
Fruit: Dehiscent
Flowers: Showy
Flower Color: Yellow
Bloom Size: 1"-2"
Flower Time: Summer
Inflorescence Height : 12 inches
Underground structures: Taproot
Suitable Locations: Xeriscapic
Uses: Flowering Tree
Will Naturalize
Edible Parts: Flowers
Wildlife Attractant: Birds
Hummingbirds
Other Beneficial Insects
Resistances: Drought tolerant
Propagation: Seeds: Can handle transplanting
Other info: Sow seeds in sandy soil. Seeds germinate in a few weeks at temperatures between 68 and 75 degrees F. Seedlings need moist but well-drained soil.
Propagation: Other methods: Cuttings: Stem
Pollinators: Birds
Containers: Needs excellent drainage in pots
Miscellaneous: Tolerates poor soil

National plant of Namibia. The branches were used to make quivers, hence the name. Insects, birds, and mammals are drawn to the nectar, and it provides nesting sites for sociable weavers. Interestingly, a hollowed out dead plant can be used as a natural refrigerator as the fibrous tissue of the trunk has a cooling effect. Young flower buds are edible and taste similar to asparagus.

Species listed as 'Vulnerable' by the IUCN.

Large, fat, slow-growing tree aloe from a very harsh and dry winter rainfall area in northwestern South Africa, extending into Namibia. Trunk has a rough, irregular texture. This tree may reach close to 30 feet tall after many decades. It branches regularly and dichotomously (by division of the rosettes at the crown) once the stem has reached a certain height, giving rise to a dense, rounded canopy. Flowers are bright yellow, ventricose (with a little belly), and appear on upright inflorescences at the tops of the rosettes with exserted stamens and style. They are pollinated by weavers, sunbirds, white-eyes, and starlings in habitat, where the branches are often host to weaver nests.

Best suited to dry winter-rainfall (Mediterranean) climates like southern California. Refractory to summer water. Do not overwater during summer. Limited summer rainfall may be tolerated by landscape plants with excellent drainage potted plants may do best with minimum summer water. Landscape plants develop the best form when grown in full sun without any supplemental water, once they are established. Provide excellent drainage in containers and in the ground.

Related to two other tree aloes from the same area, A. ramossisimum and A. pillansii, which are generally similar but can be resolved by differences in form and flowers. A. ramosissimum (which has at times been considered synonymous with dichotomum) is a shorter, bushier plant to about 10 feet with many branches starting close to the base. The very rare A. pillansii may be slightly taller than dichotomum but it branches much less, and its inflorescences are horizontal or pendulous, produced from leaf axils lower in the rosette.

This aloe was recently moved along with a few other tree aloes to a separate genus (Aloidendron) because they were determined by molecular studies to be closely related to each other, and distinct from Aloe. It will be found in publications more than a few years old as Aloe dichotoma. It appeared on the Namibian 50 cent coin. It is one of the parents (with A. barberae) of "Hercules", a faster and much less touchy hybrid which favors the dichotomum parent when grown on the dry side. Threatened by climate change.


Aloidendron Species, Maiden's Quiver Tree

Family: Asphodelaceae (as-foh-del-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Aloidendron
Species: ramosissimum (ram-oh-SIS-ee-mum) (Info)
Synonym:Aloe dichotoma var. ramosissima
Synonym:Aloe dichotoma subsp. ramosissima
Synonym:Aloe ramosissima

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow seedheads to dry on plants remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Casa de Oro-Mount Helix, California

Vista, California(18 reports)

Gardeners' Notes:

On Feb 10, 2015, Kell from (Zone 9b) wrote:

Per Jan Emming owner of the Destination:Forever Ranch and Gardens, a 40 acre desert botanical garden and sustainable living homestead in the Arizona desert with a nursery:

Aloe ramosissima is found only in the Richtersveld region of the Namibian/South African borderlands. It is a shrubby-looking tree aloe, usually under 8 feet tall, but with hundreds of tightly spaced branches forming a mound. The foreground plant is unusually well-developed, and the one on the ridgeline in the background is more typical in appearance.

On Sep 21, 2012, BayAreaTropics from Hayward, CA wrote:

I can only describe the color as near metallic gold,in a pot in summer and kept dry. VERY slow growing potted..and makes a nice Bonsai tree Aloe. Seems fine with any temp about 30f here. I haven't seen any frost damage-and that's with potted plants. Of the two I have one will go in the ground, the other a Bonsai pot.

On Jul 1, 2006, Porphyrostachys from Portland, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

This Aloe loves Arizona so long as it's kept warm! The big evil freeze of January 2007 killed every plant I was aware of in the Phoenix area except for one near ASU. It's a tragedy. Giant old plants are now just skeletons.

On Nov 24, 2004, RWhiz from Spring Valley, CA (Zone 10a) wrote:

Taxonomists are now starting to reclassify this plant as a form of Aloe dichotoma.

I have rooted cuttings from this plant and also A. dichotoma. The problem is they don't start to form roots until the start of the active growth season, which in SoCal begins in September.

Like A. dichotoma, takes quite awhile before it blooms.

On Dec 23, 2003, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Nice, but slow growing tree aloe known for its many branches and smooth, white stems. Other than this low branching habit and usually smaller leaf size, it is virtually identical to Aloe dichotoma, and as RWhiz mentions below, some consider a subspecies of A dichotoma. Flowers are identical. Eventually forms large mounds that make wonderful landscape specimens.This is sometimes a tricky grower and prone to rot. Also one of the hardest to grow from cuttings, though I have seen it done (just no luck myself).

JUst a note: Jan 07 freeze in Los Angeles of 27F for 5 hours killed a 1' tall seedling I had.


Aloidendron Species

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Seed Collecting:

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On May 17, 2009, baiissatva from Dunedin,
New Zealand wrote:

Zone 9b Coastal Otago New Zealand
Not long received this very sad spec, yellow-white etc, basically looked like a dead mickey mouse hand on a very small stick.
I was not hopeful so I put it in part shade outside, repotted and it's greening up nicely and has put on four or five new leaves in maybe three months of late summer.
They are a very curious thing, the green of their leaves being bright, almost 'fake' lime, and they're very plump on their funny little slightly papery trunks. Looks like it will become a very eye catching and luscious looking aloe given time.
I suspect they dont like super-strong mid summer sun so maybe keep that in mind. They do like a bit of water to keep them plump over summer.
I too have a hard time believing these aloes co. read more uld take a hard frost.
Will update next summer.
Summer 2010- Burnt to hell in spring heatwave after a very dull winter, leaves singed white and fell off. I've brought it inside now where it will remain away from near-fatal solar caprices.
Autumn 2010- :-( RIP sabaea. Never recovered from being scorched a second time and lost it's roots. Definitely doesnt appreciate seasonal light swings. Doh!!

On Feb 24, 2006, thistlesifter from Vista, CA wrote:

beautiful plant - call it "droopy" favorite character!

Not be be a stickler, Yemen is a part of Africa (continent) as is Saudi Arabia. (it was 55 years ago anyway when I last remember studying geography)!!

o well everything changes with time.

On Jul 17, 2004, Porphyrostachys from Portland, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

Aloe sabaea is a wonderful plant! We tried planting it in the ground in Arizona, but the leaves became shriveled and the plant looked unhappy overall, so it was returned to a 15 gallon pot. It might have just been a poor area for it, or it could have been a drainage problem. I've noticed many Aloes do well in Arizona if planted in or near a wash.

Also, to correct the above AND below statements. Aloe sabaea comes from Yemen which is a country on the Saudi Arabian peninsula, which, based on current geographical concepts, is considered a part of Soutwest Asia, NOT Africa. Thanks. :-P

On Jan 31, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

A different looking tree aloe with long, soft, very droopy pale light green leaves on a relatively skinny stem for a tree aloe. Native of Yemen, Asia. Striking multicolored flowers (various shades of red to pale yellow near the tips) on branched inflorescences. Curious and ornamental landscape aloe that seems pretty easy to grow, so far, in southern California. Fairly available, too.

Hard to believe this is a zone 9a plant. recent freeze in southern California (Jan 07) did cause slight damage to this plant- but that was not a real test of a zone 9a plant. If anyone is growing this in zone 9a, I would love to know how it handles the low 20s.


Aloidendron barberae forms a striking focal point in the garden, being an enormous sculptural tree with a neat crown.

It is easily propagated, especially by cuttings (truncheons) which should be left to dry for a week or two before planting. It prefers well-drained soil, especially on a slope, and can tolerate some shade when small. It should not be planted in between buildings or in spots where its roots will be constrained, as its trunk and roots need to expand and spread.

Hybrids and cultivars [ edit ]

Several hybrid varieties have been created between this species and its relative Aloidendron dichotomum (the quiver tree) and, more rarely, with Aloe species. These all tend to be more short and compact than pure A. barberae. Some of the more popular hybrids include:

  • 'Hercules' (A. barberae × dichotoma), the most common hybrid, with golden-grey trunk, and compact grey leaves.
  • 'Rex' (A. barberae × dichotoma), a fast-growing cultivar developed in Swellendam, which has a grey trunk, and more slender grey-green leaves with pink teeth. Seed parent is dichotoma.
  • 'Goliath' (A. barberae × Aloe vaombe), a very fast-growing top-heavy hybrid, with a slender trunk and an enormous head of massive rubbery dark-green leaves.
  • 'Nick Deinhart' (A. barberae × Aloe speciosa), a new hybrid using A. barberae pollen, with glaucous blue foliage.
  • 'Medusa', this is often considered a cultivar, but is in fact the natural Mozambican form of A. barberae.


Watch the video: Namibia - Keetmanshoop - Quiver Tree Forest