North texas landscaping plants

North texas landscaping plants

You want your commercial property to look beautiful. But you need it to perform well, too. When it comes to commercial landscaping in Dallas, TX, low maintenance and drought-tolerant plants are a necessity. Water is both expensive and limited and with unpredictable droughts being a relatively common occurrence, you need to plan wisely.

Content:
  • Best Flowers To Plant In North Texas
  • North Texas Cities Adapt Landscaping to Drought
  • The Importance of Planting Native Texas Plants
  • No Green Thumb? 8 Low-Maintenance Plants that Thrive in North Texas
  • Top 10 Shade Plants for North Houston
  • Best Privacy Shrubs for North Texas
  • Drought Tolerant Plants for Texas Landscaping
  • Winter Plants for North Texas
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: New Texas Landscape!

Best Flowers To Plant In North Texas

Saving time and money on your landscape can be as easy as installing the right plants. Native plants are more drought and stress tolerant, so they require less water and maintenance than non-native varieties. They will also thrive better on your property. There are several tree, shrub, grass, flower and groundcover native plants to choose from. Here are 23 of the best native plants to consider including in your commercial landscape design or installing on your sustainable Texas landscape.

Summers can be harsh in Texas, and shade trees can help protect turf and other foliage from the sun. Live Oaks evergreen can be planted in any region around early fall. The trees grow fairly slow, reaching 30 to 50 feet tall with a foot spread.

They need full sun. Cedar Elm deciduous should also be planted in the fall and need full sun. They grow at a moderate rate, topping out at 25 to 50 feet high with a 25 to 35 foot spread. The leaves turn yellow before dropping. This tree grows quickly and should be planted in early fall. It needs full sun and grows tall, but not very wide. If you want a tree that can provide some color and appeal to your landscape, you should check out these ornamental trees. The tree has fragrant purple blooms in early March that last about three weeks.

They grow very slow — reaching 10 to 20 feet tall with an 8 to 12 foot spread — which makes them more expensive than other trees.

Best in central Texas, Desert Willow deciduous grows quickly and has flowers spring through summer — although, the flowers and leaves can be messy. It gets 15 to 25 feet tall with a 15 to 25 foot spread. The desert willow should be planted in sunny areas in early fall. The Mexican Redbud deciduous provides excellent color in the spring, but it only lasts three to four weeks. The tree grows 12 to 15 feet high with a 12 to 15 foot spread.

It needs sun to part shade and should be planted in early fall. Add some structure and eye-catching foliage to your property with shrubs. A good alternative to hollies, Agarita evergreen blooms with yellow flowers and red berries February to April. They grow 3 to 6 feet high with a 3 to 6 foot spread, and they need sun to part shade. You should install them in early spring or early fall. For areas east of Austin to Houston, try Flame Acanthus deciduous. They have red-orange flowers during the summer through fall and attract hummingbirds and butterflies.

They have a 3 to 4 foot height with a 3 to 4 foot spread. They need sun to part shade and should be planted in early spring or fall. Texas Sage evergreen provides massive amounts of purple flowers several times during the growing season. They should be planted in early spring or early fall in full sun, and they have a 4 to 5 foot height with a 4 to 5 foot spread.

When you want plants that last more than a year, try these native perennials. The perennial blooms with large, yellow flowers throughout the summer. You should plant them in early spring or fall, and they must be cut back in the winter.

Black-Eyed Susans can grow 1 to 2 feet high with a 1 to 2 foot spread. Esperanza deciduous blooms spring through fall with large, yellow flowers. They do best if you plant them in early spring or fall and need full sun. You must cut them back to the ground each year. These work for all regions and grow 4 to 8 feet high with a 4 to 6 foot spread. You can also enjoy colorful blooms with Texas Lantana deciduous , which can be planted in all regions. It blooms summer through fall with orange and yellow flowers.

It needs full sun and must be cut back each year. You should plant it in early spring or fall. It reaches 3 to 5 feet high with a 4 to 6 foot spread.

A good flowering plant for shady areas is Rock Rose deciduous. It should be planted in early spring or fall and works for all regions. It has pink blooms during the summer and needs sun to shade. Rock Rose grows 2 feet high with a 2 foot spread.

For unique colors, install Century Plant evergreen. The leaves are a blueish-gray color. It blooms with one very tall flower but dies afterward. At the end of the leaves are large thorns, so keep these plants away from pedestrian areas. They need mostly sun areas, but they can handle some shade. They reach 6 feet tall with an 8 to 10 foot spread. Add a pop of color with Red Yucca evergreen. It has small red flowers on large stalks that droop over, and it blooms throughout the summer.

You can plant these anytime, and they work in all regions. They grow 6 feet high with a 4 foot spread. The cactus does best in Central Texas and can be planted anytime. The cactus blooms late spring to summer with yellow flowers and needs full sun. They reach 3 to 4 feet tall with a 3 to 4 foot spread. Another plant for the central part of the state is Texas Sotol evergreen. It has flowers that come out on large stalks in early summer. The leaves are lined with thorns, so keep them away from pedestrians.

They can be planted anytime and need full sun. They also reach 3 to 4 feet tall with a 3 to 4 foot spread. You can add texture and color with ornamental grasses. Plus, they are low-maintenance and reduce the chance of soil erosion.

Although best in Houston, Inland Sea Oats can be planted in any region in early spring or fall. The grass needs part sun to shade.

Inland Sea Oats reach 2 to 4 feet high with a 3 to 6 foot spread. Good in any region, Big Muhly has feathery seed heads that appear in the fall. It grows 3 to 4 feet high with a 3 to 4 foot spread. Another one you can plant in any region is Gulf Muhly. It is best to install the ornamental grass in early spring or fall.

Gulf Muhly has pink feathery seed heads during the fall that provide excellent color. To help prevent soil erosion and cut back on maintenance time, install native groundcovers. Here are a few that will work in any region across Texas. Frogfruit deciduous is an attractive groundcover that spreads rapidly. It has small white flowers and is a good host for butterfly larva.

Frogfruit should be planted in early spring or fall. An evergreen, Horseherb is most useful in shade to part-shade areas. It competes with turf grasses, so it needs to be maintained. Horseherb blooms all year, but the flowers are small and visually insignificant. You should install it in early spring. Silver Ponyfoot evergreen should also be planted in early spring or fall.

It spreads out like carpet and has an interesting blue-gray color. Whether you are renovating or starting fresh on your landscape, use native plants to save water, money and time — and make the property more sustainable.

We believe in going with native plants so much that we put it in our name. Native Land Design is committed to the environment and our clients, and we use low-maintenance plant material to create sustainable landscapes.

Contact Native Land Design for your commercial landscape property. Native Land Design has reliably been servicing The Domain Austin, TX for four years and continue to be attentive and thorough in their care. We are extremely appreciative of their efforts and hope to have a long lasting relationship. We would recommend them to anyone looking for a solid commercial landscaping contractor. Native Shade Trees Summers can be harsh in Texas, and shade trees can help protect turf and other foliage from the sun.

Native Ornamental Trees If you want a tree that can provide some color and appeal to your landscape, you should check out these ornamental trees. Native Shrubs Add some structure and eye-catching foliage to your property with shrubs.


North Texas Cities Adapt Landscaping to Drought

A: When is the best time to plant trees and shrubs? Most people would probably advise you to plant in the spring. Nurseries are fully loaded in the spring and all your neighbors are out shopping for plants. But fall can be a better planting time in North Central Texas for many landscape plants. Once fall arrives, temperatures are cooler and the heat and stress of summer are months away.

The Texas SmartScape program educates citizens on the ecological, economic and aesthetic benefits of using landscaping plants, shrubs, grasses and trees.

The Importance of Planting Native Texas Plants

Trees offer environmental benefits by providing food and shelter for birds and insects and sequestering carbon, monetary benefits by lessening summer cooling costs with their shade and health benefits including reducing pollutants and providing oxygen. Most of North Central Texas is part of the cross timbers ecoregion. Many tree varieties are native to this area and thrive even under challenging environmental conditions and soil types. The Texas Forest Service has an interactive guide for tree selection to help choose the right tree for a given location and landscaping purpose. Input conditions sunlight, soil conditions, height, etc. Texas SmartScape tree varietal recommendations. His article, Tree Planting and Care explains how to prepare the soil, which tree to select, and how to plant and irrigate young trees. Texas Forest Service guide to Tree Planting to help you select a site, plant and maintain your trees. How to plant a tree. Tree selection and planting.

No Green Thumb? 8 Low-Maintenance Plants that Thrive in North Texas

With reservoirs low, watering still restricted and Mother Nature stingy with rainfall, several North Texas cities are trying to make their landscaping rules more drought-tolerant. Corinth, in Denton County, tweaked its weed ordinance in October to exempt well-groomed ornamental and native grasses from the 6-inch height limit. Cities including Rockwall and McKinney are considering broader rules, aimed at encouraging developers to design landscapes and irrigation systems with conservation in mind. And Frisco gave final approval to a far-reaching new landscaping ordinance last month, capping a research and planning effort that began nearly three years ago. They typically have water issues and have been dealing with this for a while.

Want to start growing Texas native plants in your yard but not sure where to start?

Top 10 Shade Plants for North Houston

North Central Texas Natives. Cross Timbers Ecoregion. Blackland Prairies Ecoregion. High Performance Landscapes. Butterfly and Moth Plants. Native Bee Plants.

Best Privacy Shrubs for North Texas

From the Great Plains to the Gulf Coast, the great state of Texas has a diverse range of local climates. Each region has its own beautiful native flora that could make a perfect addition to your landscape. Make gardening a little easier on yourself while benefiting local ecosystems with these native Texas wildflowers, shrubs, trees, succulents, and vines. This tall conifer with spreading branches creates a spectacular show in fall when its leaves turn a brilliant orange. In summer, black-eyed Susans bloom in a blanket of bright yellow, daisy-like flowers. This native Texas wildflower is drought-tolerant and attracts butterflies. Depending on how you prune it, the Mexican buckeye can grow as a large shrub or small tree. The multi-trunked plant has light gray or brown bark and produces fragrant bright pink flowers that attract honey bees and butterflies.

an earthwise guide for Central Texas. Native Texas native plants provide greater Our native landscape is the inspiration for this guide to earthwise.

Drought Tolerant Plants for Texas Landscaping

Saving time and money on your landscape can be as easy as installing the right plants. Native plants are more drought and stress tolerant, so they require less water and maintenance than non-native varieties. They will also thrive better on your property.

Winter Plants for North Texas

RELATED VIDEO: Texas Native Plants for Home and Gardens

May 15, By webadmin. We compiled a list of a few of our favorite low-maintenance plants. Expect to have blooms on your scabiosa from early spring until the first frost. Iris is a staple in southern perennial gardens because thrives in full sun, poor soils, and low water conditions.

When choosing trees and shrubs for your Flower Mound, Highland Village, or West Plano, TX home, you want options that not only look great but perform well, too.

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Planting Zone Map for Texas. The second largest of the 50 states in both population and land, Texas seems to do everything on a grand scale—and that includes gardening! With its intersection of several climate zones, this Panhandle State can produce a variety of weather conditions. This can present a lot of gardening challenges…but also a multitude of choices. Nature Hills Nursery has over 13 years of experience in assisting Texas gardeners with all their gardening concerns as well as supplying the best products for the unique needs of Texans.

Texas rarely comes to mind, but the truth is that the second-largest state in the US receives its fair share of storms, temperature extremes, and drought. And in a state that is already known for high temperatures and desert-like conditions, drought is a weather phenomenon that makes landscaping and gardening in Texas a challenge at times. Drought, by definition, is a period of time during which precipitation levels drop below average for the area.


Watch the video: Theo Talley, cello, senior recital, UNT, Denton, Texas