Best backyard fruit trees australia

Best backyard fruit trees australia

A decade ago, during a summer holiday in France, I was walking through a village in the Loire valley and, being horticulturally nosy, I became engrossed with what was being grown in the back gardens. Looking over several walls and fences, I was fascinated by how many gardens were planted with fruit trees, especially ornamental ones such as cherry, plum, apple and pear. Several years later, during a trip to Vietnam, I discovered a similar use of fruit trees grown around homes. While the trees in the warm climate gardens of Vietnam were very different from those in temperate France, the use of productive trees, such as mango, citrus and pawpaw, indicated that growing food at home was an important part of Asian culture. With the exception of a lemon or banana growing near the back fence, few Australian suburban backyards include fruit trees.

Content:
  • Mini Orchards
  • 20 Fruit Trees that Grow in Brisbane
  • A local version of The Love The Garden website exists
  • Our Recommendations for the Best Backyard Citrus Trees
  • A Guide to Fruit Trees in the Home Garden
  • Dwarf fruit trees: How to grow and care for
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: Growing cherry trees bursting with fruit - Growing fruit and veg - Gardening Australia

Mini Orchards

Gardeners can make an impression, even if it is small. We can certainly grow as much of our own food as possible and we can buy locally.

Both practices help to cut down on "food miles", the carbon emissions that are the result of our produce travelling in planes, boats and trucks to reach our tables. But it's not only polluting food miles that need to be taken into account when buying food. Our health also needs to be considered.

The globalisation of food presents potential hazards, as it's impossible to test everything that comes into the country. Australian-grown vegetables are subject to safety regulations, but these are not uniform worldwide. John Howard recently warned that we may need to import more food because of lack of rain in the Murray-Darling Basin and, if he is right, the health risks are likely to increase. This prospect encourages many people to grow their own. It is difficult to be totally self-sufficient in today's shrinking gardens but at least you know that anything you grow is safe to eat.

Cultivating vegetables and herbs is within most people's reach and growing your own fruit is becoming increasingly popular. But don't worry, as it is possible to grow fruit in small backyards, courtyards and even in pots. Espalier, the art of cultivating a tree on a flat surface, is an ideal way of growing fruit trees in small spaces. You can espalier on walls, fences or even on freestanding structures. A freestanding espalier can be placed to divide the garden or can form a backdrop to the vegetable garden.

Apples and pears are ideal for espalier but you can also espalier figs, cherries, apricots, plums, almonds and citrus. Self-pollinating trees are also good for small backyards, as you only need to plant one tree and not a pollinator. The nashi pear 'Nijiseiki' is a medium-sized tree with juicy fruit that doesn't need a pollinator.

Digger's Seeds www. Multi-grafted trees are ideal for use in small spaces. Multi-grafting allows you to have up to eight different varieties on one tree. The Fruit Salad Tree Company www. The Fruit Salad Tree Company also has a stone fruit tree that produces peaches, nectarines, plums, apricots and peachcots.

Apple or nashi pear fruit salad trees are also available. Some pruning is generally needed to prevent one variety from becoming too dominant on the tree.

Planting two trees in one hole is another space-saving technique that allows you to have a larger than usual range of fruit and a longer cropping time. If, for example, you plant a jonathan apple and a granny smith apple together, the jonathan fruit will mature in March while the granny smith will mature in April. You can plant plums, peaches or nectarines in the same fashion.

Planting two trees in the same hole enables you to fulfil cross-pollination requirements. Plant them in one hole about cm apart. You can also buy dwarf fruit trees. Digger's Seeds has a new dwarf fruit tree collection that includes three types of apples and two pears. The trees have dwarfing root stocks but produce full-sized fruit. Their 2m height ensures fruit is accessible and that trees are easily pruned and netted to protect ripening fruit from marauding birds.

You can choose from the heritage apple 'Snow', which has small crunchy fruit; sweet and tasty 'Gravenstein'; and Australia's heirloom apple, 'Granny Smith'. Pear cultivars include the brown-skinned 'Beurre Bosc' and 'Williams'. The popular Ballerina columnar apple trees have been around for a few years now.

They have an upright, pole-like habit and full-sized fruit. These small trees reach a height of only m and have a width of 30cm after 20 years. Nectarines and peaches look good in flower and fruit. Two dwarf varieties - a nectarine called 'Nectazee' and a peach called 'Pixzee' - will fit into the smallest gardens. Reaching a height and width of about 1. A grafted tree with a combination of 'Nectazee' and 'Pixzee' has just been released.

These small trees produce large amounts of fruit and are suited to cool and warm-temperate gardens. See them at www. A good soil or potting mix, plenty of sunshine, water and regular applications of manure, compost or a complete plant food are the decisive factors in growing healthy fruit trees. Phone or see www. Bookings essential. Take a bite out of the backyard. Please try again later. The Sydney Morning Herald. By Cheryl Maddocks May 17, —Save Log in , register or subscribe to save articles for later.

Normal text size Larger text size Very large text size. Grow your own fruit on trees compact enough for even the smallestof gardens. It's time to License this article.


20 Fruit Trees that Grow in Brisbane

Gardeners can make an impression, even if it is small. We can certainly grow as much of our own food as possible and we can buy locally. Both practices help to cut down on "food miles", the carbon emissions that are the result of our produce travelling in planes, boats and trucks to reach our tables. But it's not only polluting food miles that need to be taken into account when buying food. Our health also needs to be considered. The globalisation of food presents potential hazards, as it's impossible to test everything that comes into the country.

soursop; tamarillos; thai apple. Thank you to the knowledgeable people on the Brisbane Local Food ning group who helped to compile this great.

A local version of The Love The Garden website exists

Shop online or find a retail nursery stockist. Browse fruit trees Blueberries for all climates. Due to extended delivery times by Australia Post and an increase in plants being lost by Australia Post we have no choice but to cease online sales of Blueberries until late JanuaryThey are small trees — with big fruit! A PlantNet exclusive. These cherry varieties have great eating characteristics, are all self-pollinating and have dwarfing tree size. Fruit just got healthier! An large range of dwarf fruit trees which are perfect for pots, tubs and growing in confined spaces. We provide a high quality range of ornamental, full size fruit trees and dwarf fruit trees, blueberry plants and pest control products.

Our Recommendations for the Best Backyard Citrus Trees

Please note our despatch team are taking a well-earned break and all new orders will be despatched from 4 January. Wishing our members a wonderful Christmas and a very Happy New Year! Learn more. My Diggers Sign in Register. Plant finder Seeds to sow now Sign in.

Can I tell you that we all have room for fruit trees and through this workshop, I will demonstrate just that, I will show you how you can fit them in at your place. We all should be planting more trees, to be honest to help our climate out.

A Guide to Fruit Trees in the Home Garden

If you reckon your backyard is too small for fruit trees — think again! As well as the apples, citrus, nectarines and peaches that you might already know about, you can now get mini versions of everything from avocados to Aussie finger limes, feijoas to figs, mulberries to mangoes, pomegranates to persimmons, and lots, lots more. The new generation of mini fruit trees produce crops of delicious, full-sized fruit. Some plants are naturally small trees such as a kaffir lime tree, which reaches only 1. This varies with each tree, but to give you some examples of the sizes to expect, try these little ones for size.

Dwarf fruit trees: How to grow and care for

The vendors at the farmers' market will soon be missing you. Nothing will turn your backyard into a luscious oasis like an orchard of dwarf fruit trees. You don't even need a lot of ground area to grow a small tree; put them in containers and reenergize your outdoor living space with pots of flowering peach and apple trees. With a little patience and work, you will soon be harvesting sweet produce from your own dwarf fruit trees. Fortunately, no genetic engineering or modification is involved in making dwarf fruit trees. Instead, they are created using the old- fashioned technique of grafting.

Why not grow your fruit tree in a wicking bed? Wicking beds keep your fruit trees and nut trees hydrated all year round. Top tips for healthy fruit trees & nut.

Very few fruits can rival citrus fruits when it comes to versatility. Furthermore, citrus fruits are commonly used in a wide range of non-food items, from dishwashing liquids to perfumes and cosmetics. The citrus family is believed to have originated from Southeast Asia, specifically from the Malay archipelago.

RELATED VIDEO: How to grow fruit flat out - Urban Farming - Gardening Australia

While growing stone fruit in your home garden can be a challenge, the reward of picking and eating your own freshly grown nectarines, apricots or peaches is worth the effort. These simple guidelines for planting, maintaining and pruning stone fruit trees will help you turn your backyard into a stone fruit sanctuary in no time. Full sun exposure, good drainage and room to grow are essential elements in the success of growing fruit trees. While the fruit is developing be sure to fertilise regularly and top up the water through the dry spells. In contrast, if your stone fruit tree will be exposed to the winter chill without frost, new low-chill varieties are available. You can reduce set-back by planting your stone fruit trees in winter as the trees are dormant and are cheaper to purchase bare-rooted.

Winter in Melbourne is the time to attend to our fruit trees.

I like big. Big pizzas, large ice cream cones and giant apple trees that fruit for three months and supply enough apple crumble for a fundraiser. But big trees need space. If you have a small backyard, forget plans to have a bunya forest. Spreading chestnut trees need village smithy-sized spaces to house them.

Whether it is a backyard fruit tree or an orchard, netting can provide a reliable physical barrier between animals and a crop. Growers can use a range of netting options to protect orchard crops from damage by flying foxes, birds, possums, rats, and even some insects. Using the right type of netting will protect the fruit. Using the wrong type, or badly erected netting may injure or kill animals if they become entangled.