When to plant rosemary seeds indoors

When to plant rosemary seeds indoors

When to plant rosemary seeds indoors or out.

Many rosemary lovers have been anxiously wondering when to plant their seedlings. Some have successfully raised their rosemary over the winter, while others are in deep planning stages. So, what do you do?

It’s easy to understand why these questions come up. Some say that seedlings should be planted as soon as the soil is warm enough and that they can germinate even under the ground. Others claim that their seedlings did fine in their last garden, yet they are still having a hard time getting their seeds to germinate in their own soil.

The truth is that you don’t have to wait for the soil to warm up. Rosemary is easy to grow and starts popping up all over the place at any time of the year.

One of the questions I received the most in my rosemary seeds mail order was about when should I plant my rosemary seeds indoors or outside. I got asked this question on several forums and I’m writing about this subject as well.

It is a very subjective issue and as a rosemary gardener, you have your own opinion. I will share some information with you about rosemary seeds in both situations.

When to Plant Rosemary Seeds Indoors

This is the easiest situation. You can grow your seedlings under lights and you can plant them in soil with good drainage.

Before you plant them in the soil, you should sterilize your soil by watering them with water with some dish soap or bleach and keep them in a dark place for a few weeks.

There is nothing special to do other than the same things you would do for any seeds, such as preparing the soil, covering with a seed starting mix, keeping the water level up and humidity low.

Plant your seedlings after 1/3 of the soil in your raised bed has been used and after your seedlings have been planted, you can fill up the remaining soil. When it comes to putting the pots in the pots, make sure that you keep the roots apart as much as you can.

When you notice the first rosemary leaf, don’t be so hard on yourself. The leaf comes up only to protect itself so that it does not get attacked by something and I can guarantee you that the leaves you see in your herb garden are not doing it out of any desire to show off.

When it comes to watering your indoor rosemary seedlings, the water should be at a depth of 1-2 inches for the first month. For the second and third months of the growing period, you should water the seedlings up to 2 inches deep.

The temperature should be kept a few degrees lower than for other plants, usually in the range of 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Rosemary loves a cool climate and they have a high water needs. They tolerate a lot of shade and they need less water than other herbs.

When you get your rosemary plants for your herb garden, you should wait to start them indoors until you get more experience with germination. Your indoor rosemary seedlings should be potted in some form of a high quality potting mix with peat and bark. The mix should be a mixture of three parts high quality peat, one part sand and two parts high quality perlite or pumice.

Rosemary is a wonderful addition to a healthy herb garden, so get out there and start something new today!

Rosemary Information

Rosemary Information

Description:

There are two kinds of Rosemary. The wild type is called rosemary and the cultivated kind is called Spanish Rosemary. There is a difference between the two. Rosemary is a perennial herb, however, it is one that needs to be replanted every year because it does not grow from seed.

The only reason to grow Spanish Rosemary as a potted plant is if you are going to use it to make dried rosemary needles.

Rosemary Information

Description:

There are two kinds of Rosemary. The wild type is called rosemary and the cultivated kind is called Spanish Rosemary. There is a difference between the two. Rosemary is a perennial herb, however, it is one that needs to be replanted every year because it does not grow from seed.

The only reason to grow Spanish Rosemary as a potted plant is if you are going to use it to make dried rosemary needles.

Rosemary Information

Description:

Rosemary has a very aromatic and fragrant fragrance and is used widely in cooking. It is also very useful in preventing the growth of molds and mildews. Rosemary is an easy-to-grow perennial and it needs full sun and a well-drained, light soil.

Rosemary Information

Description:

Rosemary has a very aromatic and fragrant fragrance and is used widely in cooking. It is also very useful in preventing the growth of molds and mildews. Rosemary is an easy-to-grow perennial and it needs full sun and a well-drained, light soil.

Rosemary Information

Description:

Rosemary has a very aromatic and fragrant fragrance and is used widely in cooking. It is also very useful in preventing the growth of molds and mildews. Rosemary is an easy-to-grow perennial and it needs full sun and a well-drained, light soil.

Rosemary Information

Description:

Rosemary has a very aromatic and fragrant fragrance and is used widely in cooking. It is also very useful in preventing the growth of molds and mildews. Rosemary is an easy-to-grow perennial and it needs full sun and a well-drained, light soil.

Rosemary Information

Description:

Rosemary has a very aromatic and fragrant fragrance and is used widely in cooking. It is also very useful in preventing the growth of molds and mildews. Rosemary is an easy-to-grow perennial and it needs full sun and a well-drained, light soil.

Rosemary Information

Description:

Rosemary has a very aromatic and fragrant fragrance and is used widely in cooking. It is also very useful in preventing the growth of molds and mildews. Rosemary is an easy-to-grow perennial and it needs full sun and a well-drained, light soil.

Rosemary Information

Description:

Rosemary has a very aromatic and fragrant fragrance and is used widely in cooking. It is also very useful in preventing the growth of molds and mildews. Rosemary is an easy-to-grow perennial and it needs full sun and a well-drained, light soil.